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      Step Into the Studio

at the easel

 
 

 


PAINTING OVER PAINTING

On the easel: Watch the process as an old work becomes something brand new.

 Painting shells In the studio with reference material gathered at the beach,  "Remains at Water's Edge" is nearly completed.

Watercolors underwayUsing photo reference materials to begin several water colors at once.

 
    This triptych is never going to paint itselfSketching in Vermont for the Vermont Autumn Triptych.

 

painting moonrise
beginning jar painting

 

One evening, I sat down with some colors. No reference materials, The summer ocean breeze was blowing through the studio. I had no idea where this would end up. I wound up painting late into the night, entirely from memories inspired by the scent of the ocean air at night.

"Moonrise" was the result.









Studio Scenes:


A new sketch--the moment when the jar series I was painting took on a strange new life. After flying through the atmosphere in their last portrait, the jars have arrived in downtown Beijing.

I am still fascinated with the concept of what becomes of vessels (shells, bottles, jars, and more) when they no longer serve their original purpose. Do they become things of beauty? Are they broken and discarded? Do they develop new self-directed lives? Do they begin an eerie existence in a strange new setting?

It’s all about second chances . . . and what we make of them.
beginning Last LightBeginning "Last Light"

New Bedford Studio 2017
New Bedford Studio 2017


Dartmouth Studio 2016
Beginning Tropical MemoriesBeginning "Tropical Memories." .
New Bedford Studio II
New Bedford Studio 2017

Life Drawing, Gallery XLife Drawing, Gallery X

H2O paintingsWater paintings in the studio

 


GALLERY SCENES:



True Grit Gallery

.Gallery X

open studio 2017













 
Quench exhibition
Part of "Quench" exhibition at the Vault Gallery of Fine Art




Arts League of Road Island, Vets Gallery

 

Vault Gallery


Quench reception













 I am a former museum director and emerging interdisciplinary artist, working in  
  watercolor, acrylics, oils, or fiber. I use watercolor when I want to create an
  intimate work — one that invites a viewer to come close to the work for a very
  personal and subtle experience. My acrylic and oil paintings speak more loudly
  through their size and color intensity. My fiber sculptures focus on experimental
  concepts and textures.
 

  My current work is inspired by nature and the passage of time within the natural
  world. An entire landscape changes, not just seasonally or with time of day, but
  with fleeting patterns of shadows, ocean breezes, or early morning mist. I want to
  capture a specific moment more than the particular placement of trees, hills, and
  streams. Late in his career, George Inness said “Knowledge must bow to spirit.” I
  also want to paint the spirit of scene more than its factual representation.

 I am a former museum director and emerging interdisciplinary artist, working in  
  watercolor, acrylics, oils, or fiber. I use watercolor when I want to create an
  intimate work — one that invites a viewer to come close to the work for a very
  personal and subtle experience. My acrylic and oil paintings speak more loudly
  through their size and color intensity. My fiber sculptures focus on experimental
  concepts and textures.
 

  My current work is inspired by nature and the passage of time within the natural
  world. An entire landscape changes, not just seasonally or with time of day, but
  with fleeting patterns of shadows, ocean breezes, or early morning mist. I want to
  capture a specific moment more than the particular placement of trees, hills, and
  streams. Late in his career, George Inness said “Knowledge must bow to spirit.” I
  also want to paint the spirit of scene more than its factual representation.